Women's Sexual Function and Dysfunction. Irwin Goldstein MD

Contributors

Preface

SECTION 1: HISTORY

Chapter 1. Fifty years of female sexual dysfunction research and concepts

Chapter 2. History of the International Society for the Study of Women’s Sexual Health

SECTION 2: PSYCHOLOGIC & BIOLOGIC ETIOLOGIC FACTORS

Chapter 3. Prevalence of women’s sexual problems in the USA

Chapter 4. Prevalence data in Europe

Chapter 5. Worldwide prevalence and correlates

Chapter 6. Assessing the prevalence of female sexual dysfunction with surveys

Chapter 7. Women’s sexuality in context: relationship factors and female sexual function

Chapter 8. Cognitive and affective processes in female sexual dysfunctions

Chapter 9. Love and passion

Chapter 10. Sexual abuse

Chapter 11. Anatomy of female genitalia

Chapter 12. Innervation of the vagina and vulva

Chapter 13. Histology and immunohistochemical studies of female genital tissue

Chapter 14. Anatomy of the pelvic floor and pelvic organ support system

Chapter 15. Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying sexual arousal

Chapter 16. Neuroendocrine factors in sexual desire and motivation

Chapter 17. Neurophysiology of female genital sexual response

Chapter 18. Vascular physiology of female sexual function

Chapter 19. Modulation of female genital sexual arousal by sex steroid hormones

Chapter 20. Animal models in the investigation of female sexual function and dysfunction

Chapter 21. Mechanisms involved in desire and arousal dysfunction

Chapter 22. Pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in genital arousal dysfunction

Chapter 23. Biogenesis of sex steroid hormones

Chapter 24. The physiology and pathophysiology of the female orgasm

Chapter 25. Sexual pain disorders: pathophysi ologic factors

Chapter 26. Aging issues

Chapter 27. Sexual function in the menopause and perimenopause

Chapter 28. Medical conditions associated with female sexual dysfunction

Chapter 29. Breast cancer and its effect on women’s body image and sexual function

Chapter 30. Pregnancy, childbirth and the postpartum period

Chapter 31. Oral contraceptives and sexuality

Chapter 32. Sexual function and urinary tract infections, sexually transmitted diseases and human immunodeficiency virus infection

Chapter 33. Sexual function in women with women: lesbians and lesbian relationships

Chapter 34. Sexual function in women with men: partners with sexual dysfunction

SECTION 3: PSYCHOLOGIC AND BIOLOGIC MANAGEMENT

Chapter 35. Classification and diagnosis of female sexual disorders

Chapter 36. Medical history, including gynecologic history

Chapter 37. Psychosocial history

Chapter 38. Sexual history

Chapter 39. Physical examination in female sexual dysfunction

Chapter 40. Blood flow: vaginal photoplethysmography

Chapter 41. Blood flow: magnetic resonance imaging and brain imaging for evaluating sexual arousal in women

Chapter 42. Blood flow: duplex Doppler ultrasound

Chapter 43. Blood flow: heated electrodes

Chapter 44. Neurologic testing: quantified sensory testing

Chapter 45. Neurophysi ologic evaluation of female genital innervation

Chapter 46. Measurement of circulating levels of total and free testosterone

Chapter 47. History of psychologic treatments

Chapter 48. Psychologic assessment and selfreport questionnaires in women

Chapter 49. Psychologic-based desire and arousal disorders

Chapter 50. Female orgasmic disorder: treatment strategies and outcome results

Chapter 51. Difficult cases: psychologic treatment of desire, arousal and orgasm disorders

Chapter 52. Assessment, treatment strategies and outcome results: perspective of pain specialists

Chapter 53. Overview of vulvar pain: pain related to a specific disorder and lesion-free pain

Chapter 54. Physical therapy for female sexual dysfunction

Chapter 55. Medical management: perspective of the sexual medicine physician

Chapter 56. Management by anesthetic blocks

Chapter 57. Difficult cases: treatment of sexual pain disorders

Chapter 58. Available therapies and outcome results in premenopausal women

Chapter 59. Available therapies and outcome results in transition and postmenopausal women

Chapter 60. Difficult cases: hormonal treatment of desire, arousal and orgasm disorders

Chapter 61. Nonhormonal medical treatment options for female sexual dysfunction

Chapter 62. Difficult cases: medical treatment of female sexual dysfunction

Chapter 63. Sexual pain disorders involving pathology within the vestibule

Chapter 64. Difficult cases: surgical treatment of female sexual dysfunction

Chapter 65. Clinical trials in female sexual dysfunction

Chapter 66. Depression

Chapter 67. Dermatologic disorders resulting in sexual dysfunction

Chapter 68. Cancer, sexuality and sexual expression

Chapter 69. Spinal cord injury

Chapter 70. Neurologic disorders: female neurosexology

Chapter 71. Hysterectomy and alternative therapies

Chapter 72. Sexuality and genital cutting

Chapter 73. Persistent sexual arousal syndrome and clitoral priapism

Chapter 74. Role of the primary care and internal medicine clinician

Chapter 75. The role of the psychologist

Chapter 76. Role of the psychiatrist

Chapter 77. Role of the female urologist/ urogynecologist

Chapter 78. Role of the nonphysician health-care clinician

Chapter 79. Integration of medical and psychologic diagnosis and treatment

SECTION 4: OUTREACH

Chapter 80. Medical student curricula/sexual medical education

Chapter 81. Patient outreach and education

Chapter 82. Future directions