What Your Child Needs to Know About Sex

NOTES

Chapter 1

  1. P. Bearman and H. Brückner, “Peer Effects on Adolescent Sexual Debut and Pregnancy: An Analysis of a National Survey of Adolescent Girls,” The National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, inPeer Potential: Making the Most of How Teens Influence Each Other(Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, April 1999): 7–26; J. D. Brown, K. L. L’Engle, C. J. Pardun, G. Guo, K. Kenneavy, and C. Jackson, “Sexy Media Matter: Exposure to Sexual Content in Music, Movies, Television, and Magazines Predicts Black and White Adolescents’ Sexual Behavior,” Pediatrics 117 (April 2006): 1018–1027; V. C. Strasburger and the Council on Communications and Media, “Sexuality, Contraception, and the Media,” Pediatrics 126 (September 2010): 576–582.
  2. B. Albert, With One Voice 2010: America’s Adults and Teens Sound Off about Teen Pregnancy(Washington, DC: The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 2010).
  3. M. E. Eisenberg, D. H. Bernat, L. H. Bearinger, and M. D. Resnick, “Support for Comprehensive Sexuality Education: Perspectives from Parents of School-Age Youth,” Journal of Adolescent Health42, no. 4 (April 2008): 352–359; Hickman-Brown Public Opinion Research, “Public Support for Sexuality Education Reaches Highest Levels” (Washington, DC: Advocates for Youth, 1999); D. J. Landry, S. Singh and J. E. Darroch, “Sexuality Education in Fifth and Sixth Grades in U.S. Public Schools, 1999,” Family Planning Perspectives 32, no. 5 (September/October 2000): 212–219; National Public Radio, Kaiser Family Foundation, and Kennedy School of Government, “Sex Education in America: General Public/Parents Survey” (January 2004), http://www.kff.org/newsmedia/upload/Sex-Education-in-America-Summary.pdf.
  4. American Association of University Women, Hostile Hallways: The AAUW Survey on Sexual Harassment in America’s Schools(Washington, DC: AAUW Educational Foundation, 1993).

Chapter 2

  1. S. Elliott, “Parents’ Constructions of Teen Sexuality: Sex Panics, Contradictory Discourses, and Social Inequality,” Symbolic Interaction33, no. 2 (2010): 191–212; L. O’Donnell, A. Stueve, R. Duran, A. Myint-U, G. Agronick, A. San Doval, and R. Wilson-Simmons, “Parenting Practices, Parents’ Underestimation of Daughters’ Risks, and Alcohol and Sexual Behaviors of Urban Girls,” Journal of Adolescent Health 42, no. 5 (May 2008): 496–502.
  2. D. Baumrind, “Child Care Practices Anteceding Three Patterns of Preschool Behavior,” Genetic Psychology Monographs75, no.1 (1967): 43–88; E. E. Maccoby and J. A. Martin, “Socialization in the Context of the Family: Parent–Child Interaction,” in P. H. Mussen and E. M. Hetherington, Handbook of Child Psychology: Socialization, Personality, and Social Development (Volume 4) (New York: Wiley, 1983): 1–102.
  3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance—United States, 2009,” Surveillance Summaries59, no. SS-5 (MMWR: 2010).
  4. C. M. Markham, S. R. Tortolero, S. L. Escobar-Chaves, G. S. Parcel, R. Harrist, and R. C. Addy, “Family Connectedness and Sexual Risk-Taking Among Urban Youth Attending Alternative High Schools,” Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health35, no. 4 (July/August 2003): 174–179; M. D. Resnick and P. M. Rinehart, Influencing Behavior: The Power of Protective Factors in Reducing Youth Violence (Minneapolis: Division of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Health, University of Minnesota Adolescent Health Program, 2004).

Chapter 3

  1. M. D. Stein, K. A. Freedberg, L. M. Sullivan, J. Savetsky, S. M. Levenson, R. Hingson, and J. H. Samet, “Sexual Ethics: Disclosure of HIV-Positive Status to Partners,” Archives of Internal Medicine158, no. 3 (February 1998): 253–257.

Chapter 4

  1. G. Ryan, T. Leversee, and S. Lane, eds., Juvenile Sexual Offending(San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2007).
  2. F. Kaeser, C. DiSalvo, and R. Moglia, “Sexual Behaviors of Young Children that Occur in Schools,” Journal of Sex Education and Therapy25, no. 4 (2000): 277–285.
  3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance—United States, 2009,” Surveillance Summaries59, no. SS-5 (MMWR: 2010).
  4. A. Chandra, W. D. Mosher, C. Copen, and C. Sionean, “Sexual Behavior, Sexual Attraction, and Sexual Identity in the United States: Data from the 2006–2008 National Survey of Family Growth,”National Center for Health Statistics36 (March 2011).

Chapter 6

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance—United States, 2009,” Surveillance Summaries59, no. SS-5 (MMWR: 2010).
  2. Ibid.

Chapter 7

  1. N. M. Malamuth, T. Addison, and J. Koss, “Pornography and Sexual Aggression: Are there Reliable Effects and Can We Understand Them?” Annual Review of Sex Research11 (2000): 26–94; V. Vega and N. M. Malamuth, “Predicting Sexual Aggression: The Role of Pornography in the Context of General and Specific Risk Factors,” Aggressive Behavior 33, no. 2 (March/April 2007): 104–117.

Chapter 8

  1. F. M. Biro, M. P. Galvez, L. C. Greenspan, P. A. Succop, N. Vangeepuram, S. M. Pinney, S. Teitelbaum, G. C. Windham, L. H. Kushi, and M. S. Wolff, “Pubertal Assessment Method and Baseline Characteristics in a Mixed Longitudinal Study of Girls,” Pediatrics126, no. 3 (September 2010): 583–90; F. O. Finlay, R. Jones, and J. Coleman, “Is Puberty Getting Earlier? The Views of Doctors and Teachers,” Child: Care, Health and Development 28, no. 3 (May 2002): 205–9.
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance—United States, 2009,” Surveillance Summaries59, no. SS-5 (MMWR: 2010).
  3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance—United States, 2009,” Surveillance Summaries59, no. SS-5 (MMWR: 2010); J. G. Silverman, A. Raj, L. A. Mucci, and J. E. Hathaway, “Dating Violence Against Adolescent Girls and Associated Substance Use, Unhealthy Weight Control, Sexual Risk Behavior, Pregnancy, and Suicidality,” Journal of the American Medical Association 286, no. 5 (2001): 572–579.
  4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance—United States, 2009,” Surveillance Summaries59, no. SS-5 (MMWR: 2010).
  5. Guttmacher Institute, “Facts on Induced Abortion in the United States, In Brief” (New York: Guttmacher, 2011), http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/fb induced abortion.html. Accessed February 15, 2011.

Chapter 9

  1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance—United States, 2009,” Surveillance Summaries59, no. SS-5 (MMWR: 2010).
  2. Ibid.
  3. B. Albert, With One Voice 2010: America’s Adults and Teens Sound Off about Teen Pregnancy(Washington, DC: The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 2010).

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